How much do you need to modify a car by to make it come under "customized car" insurance?

Is it any part of the car you change, even just the bodywork or do you have to change it quite a lot like put a turbo in or change the engine. I was just wondering if this Toyota Supra would come under the "customized car" category or not.
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Toyota-Supra-5-speed-manual-/251389399849?pt=Automobiles_UK&hash=item3a87f9d329

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4 Responses to “How much do you need to modify a car by to make it come under "customized car" insurance?”

  1. charles says:

    from an insurance view,, anything that isnt factory standard and would add percived value to the car or alter its performance or power

  2. Its Sir To You says:

    As the other guy said……ANYTHING that isnt standard, so anything from a new set of wheels to a fullbody kit and huge power increase.

  3. The Tank says:

    ANY change to the standard ex-factory specification for the car must be reported to the insurance company. This means that you must report modifications which:

    A) Increases the value of the car, such as extra electrical gadgets or body trim (eg spoilers).

    B) Increases the performance of the car such as engine, transmission or exhaust changes.

    If the mechanical bits, engine, fancy body trims and spoiler on your Supra were part of the original specification for the car then it would not be considered to be "customised". To be safe you should compare the car that’s for sale with the Toyota brochure specification. You should be able to download one from Toyota’s web site.

  4. Peter The Piper says:

    What you need to remember is insurance company’s are looking for ‘any’ excuse to reject a claim.
    If you have an accident that is potentially going to cost them big bucks, the inspector that looks at the wreck will be ‘chuffed to bits’ to find the car has added big wheels/ spoilers/exhausts etc, because YOU have stated on your application form that the car is ‘standard’.
    He can then ‘reject’ the claim on these grounds.

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