What do most people in the UK use instead of the world "haggle" to describe bargaining for a price?

where originated the word "haggle"? or what it stems from and where? when? and how popular?

what it means exactly?

is it popular to use "haggle" in the UK? or what word use instead and when, where, how they do this ?

please explain what you can.

thanks for your answers!

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2 Responses to “What do most people in the UK use instead of the world "haggle" to describe bargaining for a price?”

  1. cat says:

    Origin: 1275–1325; Middle English haggen: to cut, chop

    So it means "cut the price down."

    The word itself is pretty popular; it’s used in all English-speaking countries. Now, the action of haggling is uncommon is some parts of the world, because of the way the economy is set up (look up "bargaining" on wikipedia for more info on this).

    I haven’t been to the UK, so I’m not 100% sure if they use another word in addition to haggle, but I know they do use haggle. You may also use the phrase "strike a bargain" but I think that’s an older term that’s not used much any more.

    I looked up both "haggle" and "strike a bargain" in the American to British slang dictionary, and what came out was exactly what I entered, so it looks like America and the UK both use the same terms for this.

  2. Show me The sun says:

    Yes we use haggle but, we also use:

    barter (mostly used to i.e. exchange, or swop rather than lower the price)
    but most of all we tend to "bargain"

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